Getting a taste of Dublin, Ireland

Ireland has become a popular destination for many people over the years, and for a number of reasons. The country offers several different elements that attract holiday makers and tourists alike, and the nation’s capital of Dublin is just the same.

Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Irelandwili_hybrid / People Photos / CC BY-NC

Dublin benefits from a historic past mixed with a contemporary present that makes for a versatile destination, and as a result, attracts tourists with myriad interests and expectations from a weekend away or longer in the Irish capital.

As a cultural hub, Dublin can offer many points of interest that include museums, galleries and fantastic places to eat and drink. Those looking to take in the majority of the city should look to make their trip at least three days long; even then, they may find that with a massive array of potential locations to discover that they require a couple more days on top. This will obviously require a bit of a boosted budget, but with someone such as ICE-Ireland.ie Foreign Exchange, you should find this easy to organise.

For those looking for a diluted list of Dublin’s points of interests, here is a bit of guide to some of the city’s best attractions:

Museums

Those looking to discover the historical background to Dublin will find interest in the National Museum of Archaeology & History. Its prized collection of Ór, an assortment of Bronze Age Irish gold, along with intricate examples of stunning metalwork that dates from the Iron Age through to the Middle Ages.

The National Museum of Ireland: Decorative Arts & History is breathtakingly accommodated within the barracks formerly containing the British Army and contains many significant collections of art and also pieces that highlight Ireland’s social, political and military histories. One part of the building is dedicated to geological collections that include fossils and the occasional dinosaur.

Main attractions

Dublin Castle is an obvious choice for those looking for a big chunk of Irish history; although the monument isn’t technically a castle, more of a collection of 18th-century buildings. The area was formerly the seat of British rule in Ireland and is a reference to a past power in the country, not just general history.

Some visitors will want to have a change from the historic elements at some point and take a look at something with a bit more life to it. For those people, the Dublin zoo would be highly recommended. The zoo is one of the oldest in the world having been founded in 1830 and is currently home to 700 species that include endangered snow leopards, tigers and elephants. The attraction is perhaps one for those traveling with children, as the zoo’s Pets’ Corner would suite the young ones down the ground, as well as the Zoo Train and play areas.

About the author: Sam writes for ICE-Ireland.ie, the place to go for foreign exchange in Ireland.

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